KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND RISK PERCEPTION OF COVID-19 AMONG NIGERIANS

Authors

  • Fadeyi Abayomi Internal Medicine Department, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria.
  • Adeoti Adekunle Olatayo
  • Adeboye Muhammed Akanbi Nurudeen
  • Awosanya Joseph Abioye
  • Oluwadiya Ibironke Omowumi
  • Oluwadiya Kehinde Sunday

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21010/Ajid%20v16i2.7

Keywords:

COVID-19, Pandemics, Risk, Knowledge, Attitude Perception, Nigeria,

Abstract

Background: COVID-19 emerged as a novel disease with global health importance. Personal and collective behaviours have been modified to prevent the spread of this pandemic.

Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitude and risk perception of Nigerians towards COVID-19.

Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted between the 30th of April and 17th of May 2020 with a national representative across Nigerians using a combination of online and interviewer administered questionnaire.

Results: A total of 1,135 respondents participated in the study with a slight male preponderance (M: F=1.5:1). The mean age of the participants was 42±12.2 years with the majority (77%) between the ages of 26 and 55 years. The majority were aware of the pandemic, mostly through mass and social media. Most of the respondents demonstrated good knowledge of COVID-19 but the unaware minority (0.6%) were likewise uneducated. Educational status had no significant association with attitude towards hand washing and wearing of facemask (p>0.05). Risk perception was however low to moderate despite their concerns on COVID-19 and lack of trust in the governments’ response to the disease.

Conclusion: The risk perception of COVID is not encouraging, hence more advocacy and public orientation must be done to curb further spread of COVD-19 in our setting.

Downloads

Published

2022-05-12

How to Cite

Abayomi, F., Olatayo, A. A., Akanbi Nurudeen, A. M., Joseph Abioye, A., Omowumi, O. I., & Sunday, O. K. (2022). KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND RISK PERCEPTION OF COVID-19 AMONG NIGERIANS. African Journal of Infectious Diseases (AJID), 16(2), 63–70. https://doi.org/10.21010/Ajid v16i2.7

Issue

Section

Articles